EPISODE 16: THE WALRUS’S KYLE CARSTEN WYATT

kylewalrusadcanKyle Carsten Wyatt is the managing editor of The Walrus, a doctor of English Literature, and the first American to be on the show.  He’s also Barry’s old boss. We spoke with Kyle about the agony and ecstasy of growing up in Nebraska, moving to Hogtown in his twenties, and why living in the Distillery District sucks. He also let Barry grill him about the ostensible shortcomings of Canada’s most awarded magazine, what new editor-in-chief Jonathan Kay brings to the table, andsurprise!why Toronto is amazing. This episode is sponsored by Regal Bicycles.

 

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EPISODE 13: PHILOSOPHER MARK KINGWELL

markMark Kingwell is a philosopher at the University of Toronto. His work in political theory, ethics, aesthetics, and criticism has made him one of Canada’s most renowned public intellectuals. And he’s the reason Barry became a philosophy major. (We’ll see how that turns out.) We spoke with Mark about his childhood obsession with Trudeau-era nationalism, living in Kensington Market as an undergrad, and the intersection of philosophy and pop culture. Mark also spoke about the tension of working within elitist institutions, civility’s relationship with political violence, and how it’s kind of hard to beat what we got going on in Hogtown.

EPISODE 12: ACTIVIST AND WRITER DESMOND COLE

me and jerry on white privilege2Desmond Cole is project coordinator at City Vote and a staff writer for Torontoist. Most notably, Desmond covered the Ferguson protests following a grand jury’s choice not to indict white police officer Darren Wilson in the killing of black youth Michael Brown. We spoke with Desmond about the resolve of Ferguson’s protestors, whether it’s possible to be an objective reporter in the face of tragedy, and how many people can’t seem to admit that they’re scared of black people. Desmond also talked about how blogging led to his career in journalism, Toronto’s denial of its own systemic racism, and still, why Hogtown is an amazing place.

EPISODE 11: JOURNALIST JOHN LORINC

photo(1)John Lorinc is a lifelong Torontonian and current midtowner. John’s words have appeared in the Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, and The Walrus, and he’s a senior editor at Spacing. John spoke with us about his Hungarian Jewish roots, how he became a Hogtown expert by accident, and what it was like to suffer cover four years of the Fords. He also talked about being independent in a Left and Right world, whether some version of John Tory will rule Toronto for eternity, and why, despite all of our faults, he still loves Toronto.

EPISODE 9: AUTHOR STEPHEN MARCHE

about_portraitStephen Marche is a columnist at Esquire, novelist, and doctor of Early Modern Drama. He’s written about sex, hockey, and Megan Fox, among many things. Stephen spoke with us about his lifelong obsession with the novel, being labelled a misogynist and idiot, and why writing is not for whiners. He also talked about how Americans could give two shits about the CBC, why writing fiction takes courage, and Toronto’s future. (It won’t be boring.)

EPISODE 8: WRITER JOHN SEMLEY

shreksJohn Semley is a freelance writer living in West Queen West. The former city editor of the A.V. Club Toronto, his writing has appeared in the Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, and The Walrus. John and Barry also share the same barber. John spoke with us about why he hates self-identifying as a writer, reading for pain and pleasure, and The Onion‘s failure in Hogtown. He also talked about the fine line between being an asshole and a contrarian, NOW Magazine’s knack for survival, and why you don’t have to leave Toronto to be successful.

EPISODE 4: MAN OF MEDIA CHRIS BERUBE

Chris (2)Chris Berube is an associate producer for CBC Radio’s Q and host of The Walrus Podcast. He’s also worked for The Grid, the Globe and Mail, Radiolab, and NPR. And he’s the former president of Humberside Collegiate Institute’s student body. Chris spoke with us about interviewing George Clinton, surviving the unpaid intern circuit, and what makes a great podcast. He also talked about working on one of North America’s most renowned radio programs, and the unknown future of journalism in Toronto (and everywhere else).